Shouldnt Accept Late Assignments

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I've always been a student that turned in HW late, and it varies widely depending on the professor. In general, I have found the humanities departments the most harsh about deadlines. The natural science classes are more lenient, with some professors clearly stating that they will accept late HW with a deduced grade. Others will accept late HW unofficially before they return graded HWs to students, and yet others will work with you more flexibly. There hasn't been a single professor of mine that hasn't accepted at least some late HW from me.

As a TA, I fully accept late HW, with no deadlines, and likewise return the HWs to students late (you can call it a "suggested deadline"). My teaching principles are fairly libertarian, and my students tend to learn a lot during the semester. That's what I care about. The only time I care about HWs and examinations is to see whether I'm doing an effective job at what the students' pay me to do, which is teach them. It's only fair to examine the students to see if I'm failing them.

It's appalling to see professors demand of their students, who, just in case anyone forgot, pay the professors' salaries, demand of their students to learn a certain way within a definite deadline. Nothing in my experience has been more detrimental to my learning. I've gained the most out of classes that allowed me to turn in HW late.

Just in case anyone thinks that students who fail to "respect" deadlines are intrinsically procrastinators, I declare that it was quite the contrary in my case. The reason I submitted HWs late was to ensure I read the whole relevant text before attempting the HW. I wanted to know exactly what I was doing when I solved a problem, rather than use "ad hoc" methods to get something that resembles the correct answer. Moreover, I would often find a passage in a text that interested me, so I would pursue the topic and do some research. Sometimes this "research" would take a week out of my time, but I learned more from the self-driven pursuits than all the professor-imposed, who was paid by me to teach me, HW combined.

It's time we do away with harsh grading policies and strict deadlines, because I don't know a single person who has ever learned that way.

On the other hand, I do know a lot of wage-slaves, also known as employees at major companies, who rent their bodies to their masters; and the masters certainly will demand of their subjects to have work done on time and subject themselves to meaningless evaluations by authoritarian figures. That isn't the environment in which people can learn and discover; that sounds more like mines, sweat-shops, and assembly line to me. Unless one wants to impose an assembly-line education, which is what's common in USA universities these days, I'd advise against serious deadlines.

55Thanks

This is a discussion on Should teachers accept late-work? within the Member Polls forums, part of the Personality Type Forums category; Why or why not? What are the pros and cons of accepting late-work?...










  1. You're not evaluating the students knowledge on subject properly if you take off points for being late.
    Originally Posted by Antipode
    As someone who is in school to be a teacher (and thus aware of child psychology and educational development), I'd say late work is acceptable.

    The argument is that "we need to prepare them for the real world"; however, education is more than just the real world. It is a time to explore--and if a child doesn't feel safe, they won't explore.

    If the student had a viable reason for the work being late, I'd let them turn it in for full credit--if not, then I'll let them turn it in for partial credit. If the habit increases, then the rules change. There shouldn't be blanket answers for all students: know the students to know what to do.
  2. No, you're given graded for knowing the subject well. Not following the rules. I never see teachers giving points extra credit points for being well-behaved. And everyone should be able to turn their work. Not just one student
    Originally Posted by Eckis
    If the student can't meet the deadline, no, they should not receive full credit... part of the grade is following rules effectively, and that definitely prepares students for the real world. And why make an exception for one student when everyone else had to turn it in on time?
If the student can't meet the deadline, no, they should not receive full credit... part of the grade is following rules effectively, and that definitely prepares students for the real world. And why make an exception for one student when everyone else had to turn it in on time?
As someone who is in school to be a teacher (and thus aware of child psychology and educational development), I'd say late work is acceptable.

The argument is that "we need to prepare them for the real world"; however, education is more than just the real world. It is a time to explore--and if a child doesn't feel safe, they won't explore.

If the student had a viable reason for the work being late, I'd let them turn it in for full credit--if not, then I'll let them turn it in for partial credit. If the habit increases, then the rules change. There shouldn't be blanket answers for all students: know the students to know what to do.
Here's reasons why I always here they shouldn't accept late-work. Students wouldn't be learning responsibility and wouldn't be learning about the real world. Here's what I have problems with this reasoning. First of off, the real world isn't like school. You're punished in job for turning in a report in late because they needed to published it in time for the readers which is loss for money. On the other hand, there doesn't have a denial for accepting late work. Why? There nothing of loss happening both parties. Why would you punish for somebody when there wasn't a loss at all? That's irrational. Going back to the second sentence, teachers aren't there to teach students responsibility. Their job is to evaluate and assess student's ability about the subject they're being taught.

The arguments for accepting late-work is that student's ability will be evaluate and assess properly